Automotive Technician

Automotive Technology

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician program offers two awards: an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree and a diploma.

Both programs include technical and general education components. 

Automotive Technician graduates work in a variety of settings:
  • New or used car dealerships 
  • Government or private fleets
  • National auto service chains 
  • Local auto service shops
  • Owner operated repair shops

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree is intended for advanced individuals seeking additional possibilities in their automotive future. This is a 72-credit program not only provides an individual with entry level career in automotive service industry, and can increase future educational or career options. The general education credits contained within the AAS can lead to leadership positions in the industry as well as act as a stepping stone to a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Engineering or Business Management.

Course Prerequisites

Some courses may require appropriate test score or completion of basic math, basic English and/or reading courses with a “C” or better.

Internship may require for insurance purposes, students must be 18 years old for the automotive program due to the internship requirements. Students must also possess a valid driver’s license.

Program Learning Outcomes

By completing this program, students will achieve the following learning outcomes.

  1. Develop the knowledge and demonstrate an understanding of automotive related systems, components, terminology and acronyms.
  2. Develop and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential to the automotive repair industries expectations of performance.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to utilize computer and non-computer based vehicle service information systems.
  4. Use automotive tools, shop and test equipment, materials, and chemicals safely and effectively.
  5. Develop critical and creative thinking processes required to effectively and efficiently diagnose and repair vehicle technical problems.

Tools of the Trade

Check out the tools students learn to use:

  • Electrical and electronic diagnostic equipment: Digital Multi-Meters (DMM’s); General Motors’ Tech 1 and Tech 2 scan tools; Ford’s Next Generation Scan tool (NGS); Chrysler’s DRB-III scan tool; SPX/OTC
  • Genisys scan tools; digital storage and live oscilloscopes; battery “capacitance testers”; battery, starter, and charging system testers; chassis ear electronic listening device; wheel balancing and four wheel alignment equipment; air conditioning refrigerant recovery; recycling and recharging stations
  • Pressure indicators: fuel pressure testers; air conditioning manifold pressure gauges;intake manifold vacuum gauges; oil pressure gauges; tire pressure gauges
  • Bearing pullers and presses: ball joint separators; bearing pullers; gear puller tools; slide hammers
  • Specialty wrenches: alignment wrenches; chain wrenches; locking wrenches; lug wrenches
  • Trim or molding tools: carbon scrapers; gasket scrapers; scrapers
  • Precision measuring tools: feeler gauges; inside and outside micrometers; vernier calipers; depth gauges; small bore gauges; cylinder taper gauges; torque wrenches

Required Tool List

Technology

Check out the cutting-edge technology students have access to: Analytical or scientific software: updateable software used in all of the scan tools and electronic four wheel alignment equipment mentioned above

Electronic vehicle service information retrieval: AllData; Mitchell OnDemand 5; General Motors Electronic Service Information (ESI)

Vehicle service and repair estimating software: Mitchell OnDemand 5

Admissions Requirements

Successful completion of the Automotive diploma or instructor approval

Program Sequence

 FIRST YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
 Course Number Course Title   Credits
 AUTO 1000  Orientation and Safety
 AUTO 1010  General Automotive Service 2
 AUTO 1167  Vehicle Electronics 5
 AUTO 2145  Suspension and Steering System Service 4
 AUTO 2159  Brake System and Service 4
 TOTAL   16
  
Spring Semester   
 
 AUTO 2005  Supervised Internship I 2
 AUTO 2164  Chassis Electrical Systems 3
 AUTO 2166  Starting and Charging Systems 2
 AUTO 2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems 6
 MATH 1500  Mathematical Ideas 3
 General Education/MnTC
 See list below
4
 TOTAL   20
  
 SECOND YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
 AUTO 2006  Supervised Internship II 2
 AUTO 2119  Engine Repair and Service 6
 AUTO 2129  Automatic Transmission Condition 6
 ENGL 1107  Composition I 4
 TOTAL   18
  
 Spring Semester   
 
 AUTO 2007  Supervised Internship III 2
 AUTO 2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service 4
 AUTO 2175  Automotive Climate Control 4
 AUTO 2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability 4
 SOSC 2000  Sociology of Work  4
 TOTAL   18
 
 General Education/MnTC Requirements
15
 Fifteen (15) general education credits of Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) are required. Students are to take the following courses:
 ENGL 1107
 Composition I
4
 MATH 1500
 Mathematical Ideas
3
 SOSC 2000
 Sociology of Work
4
General Education/MnTC
 See MnTC goal area
4

Although the general education courses are listed in the sequence above, the courses may be taken any semester and in any order.

Graduation Requirements

All Anoka Technical College students seeking an Associate in Applied Science (AAS), diploma, or certificate must meet the cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.

Accreditation

The Anoka Technical College Automotive program is nationally accredited by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Education Foundation through 2019.

ASE Education Foundation
101 Blue Seal Drive, S.E. Suite 101
Leesburg, VA 20175
www.aseeducation.org

 

.

Transfer Opportunities

To see how this program may transfer into other Anoka Technical College programs or into another college, please visit:

Industry Information

More than 230,000,000 light-duty cars and trucks on the road in the United States alone, there will always be jobs for qualified technicians. One of the automotive technician’s most in-demand and valuable skills is the ability to make a quick and accurate problem diagnosis. This requires a thorough knowledge and understanding of light-duty vehicles and their systems. Good reasoning abilities and critical thinking along with the ability to locate and understand vehicle service information is also important. Daily, the technician relies on computerized service information to locate system theory of operation, diagnostic and troubleshooting procedures, specifications, repair procedures and technical service bulletins as they service customer vehicles. It may be necessary to provide accurate repair estimates and communicate with customers and co-workers.  

Many technicians perform a variety of repairs while others seek additional training in order to specialize.  Areas of specialization include the diagnosis and repair of engines or transmissions, electrical systems, drivability or performance (fuel and ignition), air conditioning, suspension systems and wheel alignment. Due to the ever increasing use of electronics and new technology in the vehicles of the future, the ability to adapt and continue learning will be very important.

The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree can accelerate career opportunities and lead to many other related paths within the automotive service/sales area including merchandising, parts and vehicle sales. Experienced technicians who are able to communicate well with customers may become service advisors. Those with leadership abilities may advance to supervisory or management positions and manufacturer representatives. Some may elect to open their own repair shops or seek additional education in engineering or business management. 

Wages/Outlook/Advancement

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Beginners who learn on the job usually start as trainees or mechanics’ helpers. Within a few months, they perform many routine service tasks and make simple repairs. It usually takes two to five years of on-the-job training to become a journey-level mechanic. This means that a mechanic is skilled enough to perform difficult repairs. However, graduates of college training programs are often able to advance to the journey level after only a few months on the job.

With an additional year of training, journey-level mechanics can specialize in a difficult area, such as transmission repair. However, they can specialize in areas that do not require all-around knowledge of auto repair in less time.

Experienced mechanics with leadership ability sometimes advance to shop supervisor or service manager. Those who work well with customers may become service estimators. Some open their own repair shops.

Faculty

Each faculty member has hands-on, industry repair experience, factory training and certification, and current ASE certifications in steering and suspensions systems including four-wheel alignment, brake systems and drive trains (automatic and manual transmissions). Students learn about complete engine repair including overhauls, fuel, ignition, and emission control systems, heating ventilation and air conditioning systems, and electrical and complete vehicle electronic system service and repair.

Program Advisors

David Larson
763-576-4019

David Holmquist
763- 576-4187

Dave McFarland
763-576-4193

Enrollment Services
763-576-7710

 

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician diploma is a 60-credit program that prepares graduates for an entry-level career in the automotive service industry. Most entry-level automotive technicians start as tire or lube technicians. Within a few months they will be performing many routine service tasks and perform simple repairs. It usually takes two to five years of on-the-job training to become a journey-level technician. This means that the technician is skilled enough to perform difficult repairs. However, graduates of a college-level training program are often able to advance to that level in a shorter period of time.

Course Prerequisites

Some courses may require appropriate test score or completion of basic math, basic English and/or reading courses with a “C” or better.

Internship may require for insurance purposes, students must be 18 years old for the automotive program due to the internship requirements. Students must also possess a valid driver’s license.

Program Learning Outcomes

By completing this program, students will achieve the following learning outcomes.

  1. Develop the knowledge and demonstrate an understanding of automotive related systems, components, terminology and acronyms.
  2. Develop and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential to the automotive repair industries expectations of performance.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to utilize computer and non-computer based vehicle service information systems.
  4. Use automotive tools, shop and test equipment, materials, and chemicals safely and effectively.
  5. Develop critical and creative thinking processes required to effectively and efficiently diagnose and repair vehicle technical problems.

Tools of the Trade

Check out the tools students learn to use:

Electrical and electronic diagnostic equipment: Digital Multi-Meters (DMM’s); General Motors’ Tech 1 and Tech 2 scan tools; Ford’s Next Generation Scan tool (NGS); Chrysler’s DRB-III scan tool; SPX/OTC

Genisys scan tools; digital storage and live oscilloscopes; battery “capacitance testers”; battery, starter, and charging system testers; chassis ear electronic listening device; wheel balancing and four wheel alignment equipment; air conditioning refrigerant recovery; recycling and recharging stations

Pressure indicators: fuel pressure testers; air conditioning manifold pressure gauges;intake manifold vacuum gauges; oil pressure gauges; tire pressure gauges

Bearing pullers and presses: ball joint separators; bearing pullers; gear puller tools; slide hammers

Specialty wrenches: alignment wrenches; chain wrenches; locking wrenches; lug wrenches

Trim or molding tools: carbon scrapers; gasket scrapers; scrapers

Precision measuring tools: feeler gauges; inside and outside micrometers; vernier calipers; depth gauges; small bore gauges; cylinder taper gauges; torque wrenches

Tool List

Technology

Check out the cutting-edge technology students have access to: Analytical or scientific software: updateable software used in all of the scan tools and electronic four wheel alignment equipment mentioned above

Electronic vehicle service information retrieval: AllData; Mitchell OnDemand 5; General Motors Electronic Service Information (ESI)

Vehicle service and repair estimating software: Mitchell OnDemand 5

Admissions Requirements

Accuplacer Reading score must be 50 or better to be accepted into the program.

Program Sequence

 FIRST YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
 Course Number Course Title
Credits
 AUTO 1000  Orientation and Safety 1
 AUTO 1010  General Automotive Service  2
 AUTO 1167  Vehicle Electronics 5
 AUTO 2145  Suspension and Steering System Service
4
 AUTO 2159  Brake System and Service
4
 TOTAL  
16
 
Spring Semester   
 
 AUTO 2005  Supervised Internship I
2
 AUTO 2164  Chassis Electrical Systems
3
 AUTO 2166  Starting and Charging Systems
2
 AUTO 2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems
6
 TOTAL  
13
 
 SECOND YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
 AUTO 2006  Supervised Internship II
2
 AUTO 2119  Engine Repair and Service
6
 AUTO 2129  Automatic Transmission Condition
6
 Elective  See list below
3
 TOTAL   17
     
 Spring Semester   
 
 AUTO 2007  Supervised Internship III
2
 AUTO 2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service
4
 AUTO 2175  Automotive Climate Control
4
 AUTO 2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability
4
 TOTAL  
14
 
 Technical Elective
3
 Select one (1) of following elective or MnTC course:
 AUTO 2130
 Advanced Engine & Auto Transmission Diagnosis
3
 AUTO 2450
 Fundamental Welding for Automotive
3
 General Education/MnTC
 Select from the MnTC goal area
3

Graduation Requirements

All Anoka Technical College students seeking an Associate in Applied Science (AAS), diploma, or certificate must meet the cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.

.

Accreditation

The Anoka Technical College Automotive program is nationally accredited by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Education Foundation through 2019.

ASE Education Foundation
101 Blue Seal Drive, S.E. Suite 101
Leesburg, VA 20175
www.aseeducation.org

 

.

Transfer Opportunities

To see how this may transfer into other Anoka Technical College programs or into another college, please visit:

Industry Information

More than than 230,000,000 light-duty cars and trucks on the road in the United States alone, there will always be jobs for qualified technicians.

One of the automotive technician’s most in-demand and valuable skills is the ability to make a quick and accurate problem diagnosis. This requires a thorough knowledge and understanding of light-duty vehicles and their systems. Good reasoning abilities and critical thinking along with the ability to locate and understand vehicle service information is also important. Daily, the technician relies on computerized service information to locate system theory of operation, diagnostic and troubleshooting procedures, specifications, repair procedures and technical service bulletins as they service customer vehicles. It may be necessary to provide accurate repair estimates and communicate with customers and co-workers.  

Many technicians perform a variety of repairs while others seek additional training in order to specialize.  Areas of specialization include the diagnosis and repair of engines or transmissions, electrical systems, drivability or performance (fuel and ignition), air conditioning, suspension systems and wheel alignment. Due to the ever increasing use of electronics and new technology in the vehicles of the future, your ability to adapt and continue learning will be very important.

The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree can accelerate your career opportunities and lead to many other related paths within the automotive service/sales area including merchandising, parts and vehicle sales. Experienced technicians who are able to communicate well with customers may become service advisors. Those with leadership abilities may advance to supervisory or management positions and manufacturer representatives. Some may elect to open their own repair shops or seek additional education in engineering or business management. 

Wages/Outlook/Advancement

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Beginners who learn on the job usually start as trainees or mechanics’ helpers. Within a few months, they perform many routine service tasks and make simple repairs. It usually takes two to five years of on-the-job training to become a journey-level mechanic. This means that a mechanic is skilled enough to perform difficult repairs. However, graduates of college training programs are often able to advance to the journey level after only a few months on the job.

With an additional year of training, journey-level mechanics can specialize in a difficult area, such as transmission repair. However, they can specialize in areas that do not require all-around knowledge of auto repair in less time. Experienced mechanics with leadership ability sometimes advance to shop supervisor or service manager. Those who work well with customers may become service estimators. Some open their own repair shops.

Gainful Employment Report

Faculty

David Larson
763-576-4019

David Holmquist
763-576-4187

Dave McFarland
763-576-4193

For service during summer hours contact Enrollment Services
763-576-7710


 

Careers in the installation, maintenance and repair fields overall are projected to increase from 2014-2024 according to research by Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

Here are sample careers, growth expected and salaries in the metropolitan area and throughout Minnesota.

 Job Title

Percent Change in Employment 2014-2024 Twin Cities Minnesota
Median Wage per hour (2017)
Automotive Body and Related Repairer 5.60% $24.55 $21.72
Automotive Service Technician and Mechanic 2.00% $20.55 $19.12
Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialist
11.90% $25.54 $23.44
Electrical and Electronic Installer and Repairer
2.80% $29.41 $29.41
Installation/Maintenance/Repair Worker 1.90% $20.15 $20.12
Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanic/Installer 2.80% $28.44 $27.13
Outdoor Power Equipment/Small Engine Mechanic 6.10%
$18.00
$16.94
Recreational Vehicle Service Technician
2.50%  $17.35   $17.24

Source: Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development (DEED) and Minnesota Career Information System (MCIS).



“I love the Automotive program. The ability to learn via lecture and hands-on out in the shop, the helpful staff, and the instructors that I have or the greatest. The program has the latest technology in the shop and just a friendly atmosphere.”